Bill was wonderful in helping some immigrants from our community begin the process of filing their DACA paperwork. He was very patient and thorough. I would highly recommend him to anyone seeking counsel." ~ Megan


U.S. Immigration Law Information

US immigration law is a set of complex, and confusing, laws and regulations. The laws and regulations restrict who is allowed to enter the US, and the length of time they may remain here. The laws and regulations also establish the process by which people can come to the US. The first step in the immigration process is a visa application. Anyone who enters the US is required to file the appropriate documents so they can enter with the correct visa.

Visas come in two basic categories: non-immigrant visas and immigrant visas. Non-immigrant visas allow lawful entry into the US for a specific purpose (e.g. college education, temporary work, company transfer, visit family, etc.). Non-immigrant visas also last for a particular length of time (from a few days to several months). Immigrant visas (often called "green cards") allow lawful entry for an indefinite period of time, although they are subject to renewal.

When a person arrives in the US, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) conducts an interview (or "inspection"). The inspection establishes whether the person is admissible to the US. There are numerous reasons why the CBP agent can refuse to admit someone. If the person passes the inspection, he or she is admitted into the US

Non-immigrants admitted receive an I-94 form. The I-94 states the length of time the person is admitted to the US. The I-94 dictates the date the person is expected to leave (even if the visa is for a longer period of time). Overstaying an I- 94 date can create complications. In some cases, however, a person can file for an extension of stay (which allows a non-immigrant to stay longer than the date shown on the I-94), or even a change of status (for example, changing from a visitor to a student). In very limited circumstances, a non-immigrant can apply for an adjustment of status to become a permanent resident (obtain a green card).

A person arriving on an immigrant visa receives a form I-551, or "green card". A person arriving on an immigrant visa can stay as long as he or she wishes. There are some limitations on the green card. An immigration visa holder can later apply to become a US citizen.

When an immigrant applies for citizenship, the process is called “naturalization.” Naturalization occurs when an immigrant meets certain requirements. When a person meets those requirements, the immigrant becomes a US citizen.

Some people born outside the US may be citizens by birth. Citizenship which occurs that way requires that the foreign born individual have a US citizen parent, or be adopted by a US citizen.

Of course, not everyone enters the US with a visa. Persons who enter without a visa have "entered without inspection" (EWI). EWI causes a person to accrue unlawful presence, which can lead to three year and ten year bars, or even a permanent bar to reentry.

Anyone who has EWI status runs the risk of deportation. There are some situations where a person with EWI status can obtain a visa. For example, a victim of crime who cooperates with law enforcement may be able to obtain a U-visa.

The DREAM Act, or "DACA", allows to persons with EWI status to remain in the US. While it does not give the person legal status, it does give the person some protection from deportation. A DACA applicant must meet certain requirements in order to receive protection from deportation. DACA recipients can apply for a work permit, a Social Security number, and a driver’s license.

In the near future, “DAPA” will become available to some parents who have US citizen children or US permanent resident children. The rules and regulations should become know by the end of May, 2015.

Anyone in the US who is not a US citizen is subject to deportation, including permanent residents. Deportation cases can be very complicated and highly anxiety-filled. In some instances, with the right deportation defense, the non-citizen can remain in the US. In other cases, though, the person may be sent out of the US.

There is legislation pending in Congress that may change immigration law in the near future. The law may affect immigrant and non-immigrants in a negative way. Consequently, we suggest that you contact us as soon as possible to discuss your situation, and determine to what benefits you may be entitled.


"The Best Immigration Lawyer in Kansas City"
My husband and I have been working with Mr. William Niffen on my immigration paperwork for the past 5 months. We have both called and met Mr. Niffen on numerous occasions regarding preparing our paperwork and/or with questions. Al and I have worked with multiple attorneys in Kansas City, but our experience with Mr. Niffen has by far been the best! Mr. Niffen is very professional, yet takes the time to get to know his client and the situation at hand. He is prompt and detailed on all his responses to all our emails. Mr. Niffen is detailed oriented and takes the time to carefully go through all the documentation. He is able to catch errors/typos/other critical issues that need to be fixed or worded correctly. Additionally, Mr. Niffen’s office (staff) are cordial and very polite to clients. And most importantly, something every client expects the attorney who is representing them to have – knowledge on the subject. Mr. Niffen has answers to all our immigration questions. He is well versed with all the steps of the process and has clear answers to questions. There have been a couple of times when we have called up Mr. Niffen when we were stressed out about a situation and Mr. Niffen has been able to calmly yet professionally explain our options and what we can do if need be. I can without a doubt say that, Mr. Niffen has gone above and beyond to help us with our case and could not have asked for a better immigration lawyer to represent us. I would definitely recommend him !!!
Thank you so much for all your help Mr. Niffen. We would be so lost without you! ~ Nisha June 22, 2015


Barlow and Niffen PC

Kansas City Office:
Phone: (816) 842-9009
406 Armour Rd #250
North Kansas City, MO 64116

Leavenworth Office:
Phone: (913) 772-8008
Leavenworth, KS 66048

Liberty Office:
Phone: (816) 842-9009
1201 West College Street, Suite 200
Liberty, MO 64068

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Why do people use Barlow & Niffen?

- Reasonable fees
- Flexible payment options
- Excellent access to your attorney
- Phones answered by a live person during working hours
- Personable attorneys who care about your law case
- We understand what's at stake
- We can start on your case today, giving you immediate reassurance and peace of mind

Testimonials from Legal Match:

"Thank you Bill for helping me out with my wife's permanent alien residents card. Without you I couldn't have done it by myself. Thank you very much for all your help Bill. You're the best."

I worked with Bill on my greencard case. He is the best lawyer I ever worked with. He knows immigration law really well and best of all he is also very helpful and kind. I will definitely use him again if I need a lawyer in the future and I reccommend him to everyone!

My husband and I hired Mr Niffen to help with the paperwork for my citizenship. He is greatly knowledgeable in his field. He takes his time to explain things as well as carefully go over every detail with you as well as making sure all information that is needed is present. I couldn't of asked for a better lawyer, thanks Mr Niffen and keep up the amazing work that you do, again thank you!